How To Clean Bitter Melon Seeds

The Video shows how to remove the gelatinous coating of Bitter Melon 
seeds.  

Part of Fall season gardening activities is gathering seeds for next planting 
season.  Some seeds are easier to collect than others as they come out dry but most
of them are coated with some gooey substance that has to be removed from the seeds.  One
of these seeds is the Bitter Melon seed.  Each seed is coated with a brightly red 
gelatinous substance.  I surmise that this substance attracts ants which eat the sweet,
mushy substance but leave the seeds alone and usually some of the seeds will sprout in the 
the coming year but very late in the season so it is best to collect the seeds instead of 
leaving them in the ground.  The seeds need to be cleaned and air dried at room temperature so
so that mildew or fungus will not harm it.  When they are very dry they can be wrapped 
in dry paper towel then placed in a plastic bag.



Gardening In The City – II

D65AB5F9-31B9-4908-B064-1944D0E147EDThe photo above shows the young Butternut Squash fruit.  The flower petal had dried off and ready fo fall off the fruit.

Vegetable Container Gardening is fun and the fact that most vegetables adapt well in unusual environment makes this type of gardening a pleasant and healthy hobby; in addition to the joy of watching plants grow, you get to harvest, cook and enjoy the flavor of whatever vegetable you planted.

I have never grown this type of Squash before.  I was extremely pleased that it can bear fruits even if it’s grown in a pot!  The leaves are huge — the size of a big dinner plate, I’m sure the reason for this is because the pot it is planted on is on a semi shaded area, which  get direct sunlight only in the afternoon.  Plants are so adaptable, which is wonderful!  The seeds came from the grocery bought Butternut Squash which I have washed/cleaned  and dried the previous year.

This type of squash bears male and female flowers in the same plant so that one does not have to worry about planting two each planting season.  Ideally, this Squash needs a lot of space so that it’s many vines can scramble all over the place.  In my limited garden area, I let it climb on trellis or fence.  It does invade all available spaces if left alone, so if you have plants that you don’t want to be shaded from sunlight by the squash’s  huge leaves, make sure to guide the squash vines away from them.

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The Photo above shows a very young fruit with the flower still blooming.

 

Look at that glorious yellow color!!!  58A3914E-C3E6-498E-8869-EFD91894F8B7.jpeg

 

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The photo above shows two maturing fruits and one on left, I harvested.  Note the difference in color.  The mature one has orange tint coloring while the two young fruits are light green in color.